Massachusetts children’s books to read this summer

If you are wondering what to put on your bookshelf this summer, you won’t go wrong with these titles all published in the past year by the Massachusetts authors and illustrators among us!

Early Read Alouds for Day and Night

the nonsense showThe Nonsense Show by Eric Carle 

The master is back with a wonderful picture book to read aloud and laugh along with for preschoolers through early elementary grades. This is an inventive and amusing look at the unexpected and goofy things around us, encouraging readers to embrace and revel in creativity and the amazing things that can happen when imagination is your guide. (Ages 3-6) Read More »


Different kinds of literacy: Teen moms learn skills through Athena program


Athena 2016 Cover

In everyday life, we talk about many different kinds of literacy. We sprinkle our language with terms like “emotional literacy” or “cultural literacy.” Educational innovators tout “digital literacy” as something that elementary schools must start teaching if students are to function in the 21st century. In short, these uses of “literacy” seem to reflect a definition of the term that is more than just reading and writing.

But what do these new notions of literacy even have in common with traditional notions of literacy?

Both new and traditional forms of literacy are skills of processing information to discern its meaning – whether it comes on a page, a web browser, or the smile on someone’s face. We then use that information to get to the website we want or to react appropriately to someone’s facial expression, for example. The different uses of the word “literacy” reflect the different formats in which the information comes, but they share a focus on being able to decode that information and use it to achieve some goal. Read More »


Mass Literacy Announces 2016 Mass Literacy Champions

L-R: Dennis Quinn, Yamaris Rivera, Pesha Black, Gerri Guyote, Sharon Shaloo and Jeantilus Gedeus. Boston Herald Staff Photo by Chitose Suzuki.

L-R: Dennis Quinn, Yamaris Rivera, Pesha Black, Gerri Guyote, Sharon Shaloo and Jeantilus Gedeus. Boston Herald Staff Photo by Chitose Suzuki.

We are thrilled to announce our 2016 Mass Literacy Champions award recipients. The program publicly recognizes and rewards Massachusetts educators who have shown exceptional commitment and results through their work in literacy education.

Meet the 2016 Mass Literacy Champions:

  • Pesha Black, Director of Holyoke Community College’s Ludlow Area Adult Learning Center and Springfield Adult Learning Center ESOL Program
  • Jeantilus Gedeus, ESOL Teacher at The Immigrant Learning Center in Malden
  • Gerri Guyote, Assistant Director of the Peabody Institute Library in Peabody
  • Dennis Quinn, Director of Mentoring Programs at Reader to Reader in Amherst
  • Yamaris Rivera, Family Access and Engagement Coordinator at the Lawrence School in Holyoke
  • Sharon Shaloo, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Center for the Book in Boston

Read More »


Making the Most of 20 Minutes: 6 things to do with your child after reading

Before you read this post, be sure to check out parts one and two of this mini-series, Making the Most of 20 Minutes – Six Things to do with your child before reading and Six Things to do with your child during reading. This three part series is designed to give parents ideas on how to make that nightly 20 minute reading homework more meaningful, without excessive work or elaborate materials.

Your child has only been reading for 15 minutes and has finished the book, so what do you do? Reading doesn’t end when the words do! Extending the learning after the book is completed allows children to explore ideas, extend on the concepts presented in a text and deepen their knowledge based on a certain book. It also helps to reinforce comprehension, or an understanding of what they read, which is a key component of literacy. Here are six ways your reader can take their understanding of a text and their literacy experiences to a more advanced level: Read More »


Three tips to celebrate Financial Literacy Month

Financial Literacy Month Activities

April is Financial Literacy Month, which means it’s a great time to talk to your kids about budgets and financing. Only 12% of high school students in the United States graduate with any formal education in personal finance. Junior Achievement bridges that gap by providing age-appropriate programs focused on financial literacy, workforce readiness, and entrepreneurship to students in kindergarten through grade 12. Read More »